Nazi bomb detonated in Kensworth

A British Army bomb disposal expert inspects the World War Two German explosion UNCLASSIFIED
A British Army bomb disposal expert inspects the World War Two German explosion UNCLASSIFIED

A World War Two bomb which posed “a genuine risk to life” was detonated away from prying eyes in Kensworth, the Gazette can reveal.

The 50kg explosive was discovered by builders in Wembley on Thursday, forcing the Army to evacuate 300 homes and businesses near the site.

It was feared that the incident would derail plans for the League Two, League One and Championship playoff finals at Wembley Stadium over the weekend but Royal Logistic Corps disposal teams were able to move the bomb from the area after working through the night.

From there they took the device to Bedfordshire to perform a controlled explosion at 5pm on Friday.

Although both the Ministry of Defence and Bedfordshire Police refused to elaborate on exactly where the detonation took place, the Gazette can report that it occurred at Kensworth Quarry.

Chalk excavated at the site is pumped as slurry to Rugby, Northamptonshire.

The controlled explosion took place at Kensworth Quarry

The controlled explosion took place at Kensworth Quarry

An unnamed explosive ordnance disposal officer said: “This has been a very straightforward operation due to the state of the device when we arrived.

“The initial team on the ground had cleared the bomb which meant it was in a good state for us to work on it and neutralising the fuse was much quicker than it could have been.

“Although this was a routine task, these things are inherently dangerous and can be unstable.

“It’s a result of the excellent work of everyone involved that the device has been removed with minimal disruption.

“All the agencies involved, from the EOD team and Engineers, to the emergency services, have done a great job and worked together extremely well, as usual.”

It is thought that the explosive, a German Sprengbombe-Cylindrisch, was dropped over London during Nazi bombing raids in the early 1940s but did not detonate.

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Reyland, who is the commanding officer of the EOD unit, said: “These munitions do represent a serious risk to life if not dealt with correctly and should always be reported to the police at the earliest opportunity when found.”